As we continue with developmental milestones, today’s blog will start with milestones concerning the end of three months. Each stage of your child’s life is special. Infants and toddlers all the way up to adolescence there are developmental and social steps and stages. Learning about these and keeping track with them can help you guide your kids and help keep you involved. It is important that we take every step necessary to ensure that children grow up in environments where their social, emotional and educational needs are met. It is important to remember that this information is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Diagnosis and treatment should be done only by your health care provider. For more information contact your local health department or physician.

Movement

  • Raises head and chest when lying on stomach
  • Supports upper body with arms when lying on stomach
  • Stretches legs out and kicks when lying on stomach or back
  • Opens and shuts hands
  • Pushes down on legs when feet are placed on a firm surface
  • Brings hand to mouth
  • Takes swipes at dangling objects with hands
  • Grasps and shakes hand toys

Visual

  • Watches faces intently
  • Follows moving objects
  • Recognizes familiar objects and people at a distance
  • Starts using hands and eyes in coordination

Hearing and Speech

  • Smiles at the sound of your voice
  • Begins to babble
  • Begins to imitate some sounds
  • Turns head toward direction of sound

Social/Emotional

  • Begins to develop a social smile
  • Enjoys playing with other people, and may cry when playing stops
  • Becomes more communicative and expressive with face and body
  • Imitates some movements and facial expressions

 Developmental Health Watch

Although each baby develops in her own individual way and at her own rate, failure to reach certain milestones may signal medical or developmental problems requiring special attention. If you notice any of the following warning signs in your infant at this age, discuss them with your pediatrician.

  • Still has Moro reflex after 4 months
  • Doesn’t seem to respond to loud sounds
  • Doesn’t notice hands by 2 months
  • Doesn’t smile at the sound of your voice by 2 months
  • Doesn’t follow moving objects with eyes by 2 to 3 months
  • Doesn’t grasp and hold objects by 3 months
  • Doesn’t smile at people by 3 months
  • Cannot support  head well at 3 months
  • Doesn’t reach for and grasp toys by 3 to 4 months
  • Doesn’t babble by 3 to 4 months
  • Doesn’t bring objects to  mouth by 4 months
  • Begins babbling, but doesn’t try to imitate any of your sounds by 4 months
  • Doesn’t push down with legs when feet are placed on a firm surface by 4 months
  • Has trouble moving one or both eyes in all directions
  • Crosses her eyes most of the time. (Occasional crossing of the eyes is normal in these first months.)
  • Doesn’t pay attention to new faces, or seems very frightened by new faces or surroundings
  • Still has the tonic neck reflex at 4 to 5 months

 Reference:

Reflexes: http://www.drhull.com/EncyMaster/R/reflexes_primitive.html

        My granddaughter is ten months old and currently has four teeth and my grandson at one year has eight teeth. Both are progressing normally with the growth of their teeth per the guide below. Baby teeth are very important for your child’s development. Baby teeth are essential for good nutrition; important for your child’s appearance; hold the space for permanent teeth and promote good health. The figure at the end of this post is a teething timeline and will give you an idea of what to expect when your baby starts teething.

  • The baby usually cuts his first tooth when he is 6 to 10 months old, and by the end of the first year has, ordinarily, 6 teeth. Watch for your baby’s first teeth to show up in the lower front of his mouth. The two upper front teeth will probably be the next teeth to come in. The rest of his teeth will come in slowly and in time, he will have a total of 20 baby teeth.
  • When this starts to happen, your baby may have some discomfort. The discomfort makes him fussy. The gums may be swollen and tender. He may want to chew things. There is considerable variation in the time that the teeth first appear, but if the baby has no teeth by the time he is one year old, your pediatrician will most likely discuss what may be causing this unusual delay in the development of the teeth.
  • The first half-dozen teeth rarely give the baby any pain, but as the rear molars appear there is occasionally at the same time a little disturbance, such as loss of appetite, and possibly evidences of slight indigestion, which may last for a few days. The baby may not gain in weight during this period but it is not a serious matter to have the weight remain stationary for a short time. The baby will quickly regain the lost ground when he is well again, and eating his full portions.
  • Teething sometimes causes a temperature. If your baby has a temperature of 100 degrees or more, call your doctor or clinic. He may be sick and need treatment.
  • From the time when the molars make their appearance throughout life, the teeth should have daily care. A very soft infant’s toothbrush is necessary (make sure it is baby- size) and the utmost care should be taken not to injure in any way the delicate tissues of the mouth when brushing the tiny teeth. After the baby has several teeth, a parent should see to it that no particles of solid food are left between them after the baby has eaten. If the first set of teeth is well taken care of, the second set will be healthier, and in addition the child will have been taught a good habit that will last all his life.
  • Gently rubbing your baby’s gums with a clean finger, cool spoon or wet cloth can be soothing. You can also give your baby a teething ring or pacifier to chew on. Some teething rings are made to be chilled. This cool object against his gums may feel good and make him less fussy. You don’t need to put any kind of pain reliever on his gums. These wash away quickly and don’t help much. A parent should never allow anyone to persuade her/him to give the baby medicines; it is a safe rule never to give medicine of any sort to a baby unless prescribed by a doctor.
  • From the time when the molars make their appearance throughout life, the teeth should have daily care. A very soft infant’s toothbrush is necessary (make sure it is baby- size) and the utmost care should be taken not to injure in any way the delicate tissues of the mouth when brushing the tiny teeth. After the baby has several teeth, a parent should see to it that no particles of solid food are left between them after the baby has eaten. If the first set of teeth is well taken care of, the second set will be healthier, and in addition the child will have been taught a good habit that will last all his life.

* This information is not a substitute for professional medical care.  Diagnosis and treatment should be done only by your health care provider. For more information contact your local health department or physician.

Teething Timeline