Since a baby wants to put everything in his mouth, his toys must be those that can safely be used in this way. They should be washable and should have no sharp points nor corners to hurt the eyes. We wouldn’t give baby toys that have small or loose parts that may be swallowed. Rubber toys, which may be washed, are excellent for a baby. I know as grandparents and parents we tend to give our children or grandchildren a lot of toys, try not to since a child is very easily distracted and will loose interest. We find that they are satisfied with a few things, like an empty plastic cup will keep them occupied for awhile just as much as an expensive doll or other toy. We have given our grandchildren an empty ‘Puffs’ container with the lid and they learned how to remove and replace the lid. Since everything goes into the baby’s mouth, and all his toys are thrown on the floor, they should be frequently washed and, when possible, boiled, to keep them sweet and clean. It is important to remember that this information is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Diagnosis and treatment should be done only by your health care provider. For more information contact your local health department or physician.

Movement

  • Rolls both ways (front to back, back to front)
  • Sits with, and then without, support of her hands
  • Supports her whole weight on her legs
  • Reaches with one hand
  • Transfers object from hand to hand
  • Uses raking grasp (not pincer)

Vision

  • Develops full color vision
  • Distance vision matures
  • Ability to track moving objects matures

Language

  • Responds to own name
  • Begins to respond to “no”
  • Distinguishes emotions by tone of voice
  • Responds to sound by making sounds
  • Uses voice to express joy and displeasure
  • Babbles chains of consonants

Cognitive

  • Finds partially hidden object
  • Explores with hands and mouth
  • Struggles to get objects that are out of reach

Social/Emotional

  • Enjoys social play
  • Interested in mirror images
  • Responds to other people’s expressions of emotion

Developmental Health Watch

Because each baby develops in his own particular manner, it’s impossible to tell exactly when or how your child will perfect a given skill. The developmental milestones will give you a general idea of the changes you can expect, but don’t be alarmed if your own baby’s development takes a slightly different course. Alert your pediatrician; however, if your baby displays any of the following signs of possible developmental delay for this age range.

  • Seems very stiff with tight muscles
  • Seems very floppy like a rag doll
  • Head still flops back when body is pulled up to a sitting position
  • Reaches with one hand only
  • Refuses to cuddle
  • Shows no affection for the person who cares for him
  • Doesn’t seem to enjoy being around people
  • One or both eyes consistently turn in or out
  • Persistent tearing, eye drainage or sensitivity to light
  • Does not respond to sounds around him
  • Has difficulty getting objects to his mouth
  • Does not turn his head to locate sounds by 4 months
  • Doesn’t roll over in either direction (front to back or back to front) by 5 months
  • Seems inconsolable at night after 5 months
  • Doesn’t smile spontaneously by 5 months
  • Cannot sit with help by 6 months
  • Does not laugh or make squealing sounds by 6 months
  • Does not actively reach for objects by 6 to 7 months
  • Doesn’t follow objects with both eyes at near (1 foot) and far (6 feet) ranges by 7 months
  • Does not bear some weight on legs by 7 months
  • Does not try to attract attention through actions by 7 months
  • Does not babble by 8 months
  • Shows no interest in games of peek-a-boo by 8 months