How hard is it to add fruit to your child’s diet? Are your children having a tough time trying different fruits? Have you recently found out that your child has an allergy to dairy and cannot have ice cream?(what’s that got to do with fruit, you’ll see shortly) Remember your parents saying, “please eat your fruit”, well I do. Both fruit and vegetables seem to be hard for a child to accept but I found a way around the ‘fruit’ part and an idea for getting them to eat their vegetables. It is important that we establish healthy eating habits at an early age. In general, fruits and vegetables are low in calories, which is important for maintaining a healthy weight. Refer to the chart below for daily recommendations for both children and adults.

Fruit Chart

These portions work for those of you that get fewer than 30 minutes on a daily basis of moderate physical exercise, over and above normal daily activities. Children who find themselves more physically active might be able to consume more while remaining within calorie requirements.

Now the fun part, my first the fruit trick! If you haven’t found out about this product yet, let me be the first to introduce you to it, ‘Yonanas.  Our six year old grandson has an allergy to dairy and as a result cannot have ice cream, even soy based. What is beautiful about the ‘Yonanas’, you fill the chute with frozen fruit; bananas, strawberries, pineapple, kiwi, apple slices and more. The machine processes the frozen fruit in such a way that when it discharges down the chute, the fruit now has the consistency of ice cream! It also comes with a recipe book. You can freeze it into ice cream pop molds and serve it. Now your child has their daily portion of fruit in a way that’s healthy, no added sugars, preservatives, and any possible allergens.

What about vegetables? Yea, what about them. Vegetables as well as fruits are a very important part of your child’s daily intake. Refer to chart below for daily recommendations for both children and adults.

Vegetables

 

One trick we found to work is to add vegetables into various blends. Mix cauliflower with mashed potatoes. In fact you can mash the cauliflower itself, add a little margarine and salt, and serve it as ‘mashed potatoes’.  Take spinach, finely chopped and make small bite size meatballs (try with turkey meat). Be creative and your child will never know the difference.

Normally our blog is geared towards newborns and toddlers but because of the recent reports concerning childhood obesity, we felt the need to provide you with some insight. As a parent, we are concerned about our children’s health which should include childhood obesity. It has been noted numerous times that obese children and adolescents are at risk for health problems during their youth and as adults. For example, during their youth, obese children and adolescents are more likely to have risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease (such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and Type 2 diabetes) than are other children and adolescents.

Obese children and adolescents are more likely to become obese as adults. One study has found that approximately 80% of children who were overweight at aged 10-15 years were obese adults at age 25 years. Another study found that 25% of obese adults were overweight as children. The latter study also found that if overweight begins before 8 years of age, obesity in adulthood is likely to be more severe.

Our blog today will hopefully give you more of an understanding of this serious problem and how as a parent, help you to deal with it. We’ll provide information about childhood overweight and obesity, including how overweight and obesity are defined for children, the prevalence of obesity, the factors associated with obesity, and the related health consequences

Why is childhood obesity considered a health problem? 

Doctors and scientists are concerned about the rise of obesity in children and youth because obesity may lead to the following health problems:

  • Heart disease, caused by:
  • high cholesterol and/or
  • high blood pressure
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Asthma
  • Sleep apnea
  • Social discrimination

Childhood obesity is associated with various health-related consequences. Obese children and adolescents may experience immediate health consequences and may be at risk for weight-related health problems in adulthood. Many times, obese children and adolescents are targets of early and systematic social discrimination. The psychological stress of social stigmatization can cause low self-esteem which, in turn, can hinder academic and social functioning, and persist into adulthood. Then there are the risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including high cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, and abnormal glucose tolerance. Obese children and teens have been found to have risk In a population-based sample of 5- to 17-year-old, almost 60% of overweight children had at least one CVD risk factor while 25 percent of overweight children had two or more CVD risk factors.

Tips for Parent – Ideas to Help Children Maintain a Healthy Weight 

To help your child maintain a healthy weight, balance the calories your child consumes from foods and beverages with the calories your child uses through physical activity and normal growth.

Balancing Calories: Help Kids Develop Healthy Eating Habits

One part of balancing calories is to eat foods that provide adequate nutrition and an appropriate number of calories. You can help children learn to be aware of what they eat by developing healthy eating habits, looking for ways to make favorite dishes healthier, and reducing calorie-rich temptations.

Encourage healthy eating habits

There’s no great secret to healthy eating. To help your children and family develop healthy eating habits:

  • Provide plenty of vegetables, fruits, and whole-grain products.
  • Include low-fat or non-fat milk or dairy products.
  • Choose lean meats, poultry, fish, lentils, and beans for protein.
  • Serve reasonably-sized portions.
  • Encourage your family to drink lots of water.
  • Limit sugar-sweetened beverages.
  • Limit consumption of sugar and saturated fat.

Remember that small changes every day can lead to a recipe for success!

Look for ways to make favorite dishes healthier.

The recipes that you may prepare regularly, and that your family enjoys, with just a few changes can be healthier and just as satisfying. For new ideas about how to add more fruits and vegetables to your daily diet check out the recipe database from the fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov. This database enables you to find tasty fruit and vegetable recipes that fit your needs.

Balancing Calories: Help Kids Stay Active/ Reduce sedentary time

Another part of balancing calories is to engage in an appropriate amount of physical activity and avoid too much sedentary time. In addition to being fun for children and teens, regular physical activity has many health benefits, including:

  • Strengthening bones
  • Decreasing blood pressure
  • Reducing stress and anxiety
  • Increasing self-esteem
  • Helping with weight management

In addition to encouraging physical activity, help children avoid too much sedentary time. Although quiet time for reading and homework is fine, limit the time your children watch television, play video games, or surf the web to no more than 2 hours per day. Additionally, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) does not recommend television viewing for children age 2 or younger.12 Instead, encourage your children to find fun activities to do with family members or on their own that simply involve more activity.